Home » A Most Satisfactory Man: The Story of Theodore Brevard Hayne, Last Martyr of Yellow Fever by Charles Bryan
A Most Satisfactory Man: The Story of Theodore Brevard Hayne, Last Martyr of Yellow Fever Charles Bryan

A Most Satisfactory Man: The Story of Theodore Brevard Hayne, Last Martyr of Yellow Fever

Charles Bryan

Published February 1st 1996
ISBN : 9781570031236
Hardcover
166 pages
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 About the Book 

In this meticulously researched and highly readable book, Dr. Bryan details the history of an engaging and friendly but not particularly promising young man through childhood, college and his all-to-brief professional life, to a heros death in theMoreIn this meticulously researched and highly readable book, Dr. Bryan details the history of an engaging and friendly but not particularly promising young man through childhood, college and his all-to-brief professional life, to a heros death in the fight to control yellow fever in West Africa. This account traces his career from early work as a teenager with two prominent malariologists through college, wartime service and medical school to his appointment to the International Health Division of the Rockefeller Institute. It is told against a backdrop of the history of progress in the understanding of yellow fever in all of its aspects and thereby places the death of Dr. Hayne in a context which lends special significance to the tragedy. Although Haynes career with the Rockefeller Institute lasted only two years, he achieved the ultimate definition of himself both as a researcher and benefactor of mankind and as a human being. His dedication to his work and his happy relationships with those around him were the results of a long preparation which effectively suited him to what he had chosen for his lifes work. The poignancy of a life cut short is heightened by the knowledge that the child conceived in his marriage just two months before his final departure for Lagos was stillborn, and the ultimate fate of his wife, Roselle, has not been discovered. The narrative is enhanced by the generous selection of personal letters between Hayne and members of his family. They give a sense of intimacy with the players in the drama. It is a beautiful story for all its sadness- there is in it a metaphor for all who have given their lives in an effort to eliminate the numerous plagues which have andcontinue to beset the human race.